Radio dating flaws

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These long time periods are computed by measuring the ratio of daughter to parent substance in a rock and inferring an age based on this ratio.This age is computed under the assumption that the parent substance (say, uranium) gradually decays to the daughter substance (say, lead), so the higher the ratio of lead to uranium, the older the rock must be.This technique is not restricted to bones; it can also be used on cloth, wood and plant fibers.

These claims generally land in three different categories: (1) radiometric dating assumes that initial conditions (concentrations of mother and daughter nuclei) are known, (2) radiometric dating assumes that rocks are closed systems and (3) radiometric dating assumes that decay rates are constant.

There are many different kinds of radiometric dating and not all conclusions we will reach can be extrapolated to all methods used. These isotopes differ in the number of neutrons they have in their nuclei.

Also, different radiometric dating techniques independently converges with each other and with other dating techniques such as dendrochronology, layers in sediment, growth rings on corals, rhythmic layering of ice in glaciers, magnetostratigraphy, fission tracks and many other methods. Those isotopes that are not stable decay into daughter nuclei.

To me it has been a real eye opener to see all the processes that are taking place and their potential influence on radiometric dating.

Radiometric dating is largely done on rock that has formed from solidified lava.

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